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  • Writer's pictureFront Range Compliance

Beating The Roadside Blitz

With the weather starting to get nicer all throughout the country, motor carriers will be experiencing an influx in roadside inspections. Here is what to expect, how to prepare and additional information you need to know to keep you off the radar!

This year's Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) International Roadcheck campaign will be between May 16th and 18th, with special emphasis on on anti-lock braking systems (ABS) and cargo securement. Brakes, lights, tires and cargo securement routinely make up the Top 5 Roadside Inspection Violations while hours of service/logs and problems with licensure are the top causes for driver violations.


Leading up to the CVSA International Roadcheck campaign, enforcement will be gearing up and conducting more roadside inspections.

During inspection of ABS and cargo securement, inspectors will be looking for the following:

  • Determination if ABS is required

  • Ensure ABS lamp cycles on and off for required vehicles

  • Check for ABS malfunction indicators

  • Ensure spare tires, loads, cargo, and dunnage are secured and prevented from rolling, shifting, falling, blowing, spilling or leaking from the vehicle

  • Confirm amount of tiedowns used for weight and length of cargo

  • Check for defective securement devices

  • Inspect anchor points

What to expect from a roadside inspection:

There are eight different levels of inspection that could be performed on a driver and/or their vehicle. CVSA has a helpful comprehensive explanation of each of the inspection levels. For this however, we are going to focus on the level one and level two inspections, as they are the most comprehensive. For the details of each level, visit the FMCSA or CVSA websites.


Level I: North American Standard Inspection

Level I is inspection of the vehicle and driver, and tends to be the most comprehensive. The driver inspection includes a review of their Commercial Driver’s License (CDL), alcohol and drug use, Medical Examiner’s and Skill Performance Evaluation (SKE) certificates, Hours of Service (HOS) compliance, record of duty status, seatbelt usage, and vehicle inspection report(s). The vehicle inspection includes:

  • Brake, electrical, exhaust, and fuel systems

  • Cargo securement

  • Coupling devices

  • Driveline/driveshaft mechanisms

  • Frames

  • Hazardous materials compliance

  • Lighting devices (headlamps, taillamps, turn signals, etc.)

  • Steering mechanisms

  • Suspensions

  • Tires (including hubs, rims, wheels)

  • Van and open-top trailer bodies

  • Windshield wipers

Level II: Walk-Around Driver/Vehicle Inspection

A Level II inspection includes only what can be examined without the inspector physically getting underneath the vehicle to inspect. Essentially it is a Level I inspection without getting under the vehicle. At a minimum, the driver inspection must include a review of their CDL, alcohol and drug use, Medical Examiner’s and SKE certificates, HOS compliance, record of duty status, seatbelt usage, and vehicle inspection report(s). The vehicle inspection includes:

  • Brake, electrical, exhaust, and fuel systems

  • Cargo securement

  • Coupling devices

  • Driveline/driveshaft mechanisms

  • Frames

  • Hazardous materials compliance

  • Lighting devices (headlamps, taillamps, turn signals, etc.)

  • Steering mechanisms

  • Suspensions

  • Tires (including hubs, rims, wheels)

  • Van and open-top trailer bodies

  • Windshield wipers

Preparing for Roadside Inspections:

In the transportation industry, the best thing you can do for yourself, your drivers and your company is to be prepared. A huge aspect in being prepared is making sure that you and your drivers are properly trained.


Training needs to be continued throughout the driver's time employed with your company not just as part of their initial onboarding or the process to get their CDL. Scheduling quarterly training with your drivers to refresh them on company policies, inspections, maintenance and general safety. Bringing someone in to conduct training for your drivers will also be very beneficial for your company.


At Front Range Compliance, we do both in-person and online training. Our online training platform, DOT University is currently offering Reasonable Suspicion for Supervisors, Cargo Securement, Defensive Driving, and Pre/Post Trip Inspection. In the coming months, we plan on releasing DOT Compliance Essentials and Appendix A. We would also be happy to schedule in person training with your company or even training over webinar. Click the link below to look at our Compliance Training Programs.

If you are looking for more information on training or services Front Range Compliance offers, contact us at info@frontrangecompliance.com and we will do everything that we can to help you.


Until then, check out our other blogs or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to be the first to know when new classes are made available or for other updates like this! You can also opt-in to our newsletter for exclusive offers, regulation changes, and industry news!

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